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Readings and writings in theology, philosophy, politics. Following Jesus, activism, and adventure stuff.
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patagonia:

The purple glow of sunset through the notch of Yosemite Valley upon Half Dome.
Submitted by Nick Ocean
Instagram  @nocean

Here tomorrow

patagonia:

The purple glow of sunset through the notch of Yosemite Valley upon Half Dome.

Submitted by Nick Ocean

Instagram  @nocean

Here tomorrow

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mad-honey:

(via MEWITHOUTYOU - a photo on Flickriver)

mad-honey:

(via MEWITHOUTYOU - a photo on Flickriver)

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Went to Archives Bookshop in Pasadena today with T. Shelves upon shelves of theology books. Whole shelves dedicated to respective theologians, and a whole wall where you can the texts from Fuller classes and see what they’re reading (that was cool). Also liked how many women/poc theologians were stocked, lots of interesting obscure writers worth scoping out. Came away with a couple solid texts I’ve been wanting for resources. Best part though: the price stickers on the backs came clean off rather than ripping and getting stuck a la every book from amazon. Top bookstore for sure

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locusimperium:

Seen scribbled on scrap paper in Stringfellow’s archives. “Church as event = dispersion time.”
It sounds important and I wish I knew what it meant.

locusimperium:

Seen scribbled on scrap paper in Stringfellow’s archives. “Church as event = dispersion time.”

It sounds important and I wish I knew what it meant.

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thebunnyalliance:

Check out our post about why the Fight or Flight Tour was denied entry to Canada for our tour stop in so-called Vancouver BC. “The whole experience highlighted not only the absurdity of surveillance and repression for activists, it highlighted the problem of borders and the colonial function they serve.”

(via angry-hippo)

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mouthwingss:

I want to cut my hair

mouthwingss:

I want to cut my hair

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(Source: stephanieberbec)

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dagwolf:

From McIntosh:

I came to this dawning realization: niceness has nothing to do with it. These are nice men. But they’re very good students of what they’ve been taught, which is that men make knowledge. And I realized this is why we were oppressive to work with—because, in parallel fashion, I had been taught that whites make knowledge.

I think she illustrates why intersectional discourse is important. For me, we need anti-white-supremacist and anti-patriarchal discourse while we organize class struggle. McIntosh has always been so good at illustrating how feminism is important. Patriarchy in capitalist culture de-emphasizes personal experience in place of an ideologically composed individual subject. Mark Fisher’s recent Vampire’s Castle screed against “identity politics”, I think, is firmly aimed at women. McIntosh expalins,

The truth is that it hasn’t changed much, except in the universities. The colleges and the universities are the places where you get a hearing. They’re where you learn to see both individually and systematically. In order to understand the way privilege works, you have to be able to see patterns and systems in social life, but you also have to care about individual experiences. I think one’s own individual experience is sacred. Testifying to it is very important—but so is seeing that it is set within a framework outside of one’s personal experience that is much bigger, and has repetitive statistical patterns in it.

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Always good catching up with this guy, hearing about exciting life projects and sharing connections from our readings

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stephanieberbec:

After Trade is our attempt at being responsible for what we know. Perhaps the best I can describe it, is that it came forth as we learned not to isolate one aspect of life from another; a concept we are continually learning from and wrestling with. It went something like this: when we immersed ourselves in the study of coffee, as if all at once, our concern moved from a meticulously roasted beverage consumed in an attractive café, to an even deeper concern for people, relationships, farmers and families, and further, to the land, sustainability, and to other realities such as coffee when grown as a monoculture is no longer a sanctuary for birds and other wildlife. If we have learned anything at all over the past two years, it is that our concern for coffee can not only nor will it ever be just about coffee.

staydeliberate siliconandsunlight

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"We as academic theologians usually are not poor. Most of us have a decent salary and can afford to live quite a comfortable life. The beatitudes don’t mean us; that’s obvious. If we share in preaching the close connection between God and the poor, we share also in stating that we — members of middle or upper class — are disconnected from God. As far as we are rich and powerful we are part of the old world which the power of God’s basileia will overcome. If however we understand that our richness is part of a global system of sin, we are on the best way to solidarity with the suffering and to encounter God’s salvation. This implies metanoia, new thinking. If God and the poor are connected then we have to understand that our status as rich people is that of sinners called to repentance."
— Joachim Kügler, “The (possible) function of the beatitude of the poor in the context of the struggle against poverty.” Good News for the Poor and the Sick, Acta Theologica Supplementum 16, ed. Pieter Verster. (via locusimperium) _______________________________________________________________________

"What is the relationship between practices, rituals, and liturgies? I use ritual in a broad sense to refer to routines (as in how you put on your clothes or how you set the table); in this sense, not all rituals are practices because not all rituals are directed toward an end. However, all practices are already rituals. What, then, of liturgies? Neither rituals nor practices are necessarily liturgies. Thus, I distinguish liturgies as rituals of ultimate concern: rituals that are formative for identity, that inculcate particular visions of the good life. Our thickest practices, whether going to the mall or to church, have a liturgical function insofar as they aim to do nothing less than shape our identity by shaping our desire for what we envision as the kingdom—the ideal of human flourishing. They want to determine what we love as ultimate, “above all,” that to which we are devoted in a way that overrules other interests. In short, it is what we worship, which, as Kenneson notes, is simply “ascribing worth.” From the perspective of the Christian faith, the “secular” liturgies of mall and market constitute a mis-formation of desire. Christian worship, then, must be intentionally liturgical, formative, and pedagogical in order to be counter-formative to such mis-formations, into which we are “thrown” from an early age."
— James KA Smith, Desiring the Kingdom, pg 86-88, par. (via lukexvx) _______________________________________________________________________

"If a theory of justice does not take seriously “social sin” and structural injustice, then it comes as little surprise that that theory should endorse reformist and developmentalist palliatives as resistance to capitalism. Although this was the liberationists’ critique of the Catholic social teachings’ invisibility to suffering from the lofty heights of neo-scholastic theology, and their conception of justice is much more oppositional to anti-capitalist in theory, capitalism is quite compatible with justice as the guardian of rights, even when it focuses on the rights of the poor. In this regard it is not coincidental that rights discourse took hold precisely as the capitalist order was establishing itself. Far from marking a milestone in the struggle to overcome “all that limits or keeps human beings from self-fulfillment” as the liberationists assert, rights are more plausibly understood as but one component of the host of technologies that developed for the sake of governing persons “through freedom,” in accord with the demands of emergent market forces. Such rights were not first articulated with the radical meaning that liberationists attribute to them, and then “hijacked” as it were by the emergent bourgeois capitalist class. On the contrary, the modern discourse of rights was originally articulated by that class. Rights are but one element of the capitalist discipline of desire."
— Daniel M Bell Jr, Liberation Theology After the End of History, pg 126, 128 (via lukexvx)

(via threeacresandacrow)

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"Most of the ancient moral philosophers, as they pondered vices such as greed and acquisitiveness, were working with conceptions of use-value. That is, they could rightly see and condemn persons who acquired more things than they had use for. Such greed looked irrational, it was hoarding. Why would anyone want 1,000 chairs or shovels?

But things changed with the rise of money. Money shifted us away from use-value to exchange-value. Instead of acquiring chairs or forks—which have defined functions and, thus, inherent limits as to how many of these things are “enough”—we now acquire money which has no particular use or function beyond purchasing power. Money introduced liquidity into our lives, where goods can be reduced to money and that money used to purchase other goods. In modern economies liquidity is what makes the world go around. But liquidity makes is hard to determine how much is enough.

How much money is enough? It seems clear that a person with 1,000 forks has a bit of a fork-problem. How many forks do you really need? You only need as many as you have use for. But what about money? Does someone with with $1,000 have too many dollar bills? How about $10,000? Or $100,000? Or $1,000,000?

Because money has no use-value such questions seem odd. You can never have enough money because money is about exchange-value. Money can get you anything with a price, anything you need. Or want. And that’s the root of the problem. When our desires shifted to money rather than to real goods and their function we lost our ability to draw a clear line between need and want and between necessities and luxuries."
— Richard Beck, "How Much Is Enough?" (via mouthwingss) _______________________________________________________________________

angry-hippo:

You know all those famous, silhouetted animal liberation stencils? I love to find the images that they were based on and read about those old actions. In this case the original image is from the iconic Valentines Day beagle rescue at Life Science Research in Stock, Essex. You can check it out in the August / September 1983 Issue of BUAV Liberator, available for free on TALON.

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