lukexvx: about / archive / rss / ask / theme
Readings and writings in theology, philosophy, politics. Following Jesus, activism, and adventure stuff.
_______________________________________________________________________

(Source: voidwish, via dagwolf)

_______________________________________________________________________

"Is it possible, now that the revival [of the post-war era] falters and wanes, for Protestants to extricate themselves from the religious practices and thoughts represented in the revival? Or has Protestantism in America just simply and radically dissociated itself from the Gospel, and has the climax of that action been the religious revival which now is defunct? How far have the strange shibboleths spawned in the American pluralistic experience infected Protestantism? Or do American Protestants much care anyway what they believe, or what the Church is, or how the Gospel relates to contemporary American life, so long as the institutional existence of the churches is protected and the churches retain an amiable reputation in the community? … In short, does American Protestantism want merely to be, as it has largely been during the so-called revival, not to mention the times before that, the religious disguise and aura of American society, or does it want to serve and uphold the Gospel in this society even in the face of the radical and historic hostility of American society toward the Gospel?"

William Stringfellow, A Private and Public Faith.

(published in 1962).

(via locusimperium) _______________________________________________________________________

lukexvx:

Pickaxe - Part 1

"This excellent documentary takes us into another world; the world of rogue loggers and firefighters turned eco-warriors. This documentary is on par with Manufacturing Consent, Waco: The Rules of Engagement, and Breaking the Spell: The Anarchists, Eugene, and the WTO Here is the summary from the promotion: "An arsonist burns 9000 acres of protected old-growth public forest in Oregon that can not be logged unless it burns. To stop the proposed "salvage" logging of this incredible ancient forest, citizens are moved to blockade a road and keep the government out. After facing down a bulldozer and the State Police, the fort now known as the gateway to the Cascadia Free State becomes the focus for a developing community dedicated to protecting ancient forests throughout the mountains of Oregon."

_______________________________________________________________________

"In the worst oppressions and betrayals, anger is not only understandable, it is necessary. It reflects a deep sense of justice that is missing in pleas for, in Nietzsche’s terms, the ascetic ideal of “patience.” Yet, although it may be popular in the Christian mainstream to appeal to passages about divine vengeance—while these do not stand alone to other texts about mercy’s triumph, nor are they self-interpreting—hatred cannot be the final response. It is not that Christians are “permitted” to choose between revenge and forgiveness; if anything is clear, it is both that “vengeance” is God’s right, not ours, and that Christians are obligated to hope for restoration. We cannot allow anger to perpetuate itself as hatred. The paradigm case of this is none other than that of God’s struggle with Israel in Hosea 11. God indicates that what separates God from mortals is precisely the ability not to execute fierce anger, not to come in wrath but to forgive and make new. We should not recommend hatred as an adequate response precisely because of its obvious effects as a habit. We do not need excuses to hate, to desire vengeance, to return evil for evil; alas, they are already deeply ingrained into the world."
— L Gregory Jones, Embracing Forgiveness, pg 260 _______________________________________________________________________

"How we handle difficult relational situations concerning forgiveness is likely to have already been heavily determined by the habits we have developed leading up to that point. In this way, the convergence of language with feeling and action is only intelligible in the “I forgive you” where there are signs of change concretely occurring in the relationship. We learn to judge our progress in this craft that I am calling forgiveness not by observing isolated actions, feelings, or thoughts; we must see how they are rooted in broader patterns of life and narrative contexts. The varieties of forgiveness in particular lives and circumstances cannot be determined in advance under some prescribed abstract solution; they are the focus of ongoing discernment within the craft, led by the exemplars who excel in the craft and judged by the community within which the relationship is held accountable."
— L Gregory Jones, Embracing Forgiveness, pg 233, 235, par. _______________________________________________________________________

"As both a centrally significant practice of Christian life and one that has great potential for exacerbating conflict, forgiveness requires mutual willingness to confess truthful acknowledgement of our sin. Because relationships involve issues of power, we must recognize how much easier it is to rupture trust both through abuse of power and lack of commitment than it is to rebuild that trust necessary for sustaining forgiveness. If community is to be the site of our common transformation, forgiveness in a way is repenting of division and the material practices that lead to those divisions.

Much of the reliance with “counseling” in our culture is the direct result of failures to embody the kind of community where healing and reconciliation can take place. But confession and forgiveness are meaningless unless they occasion a turning—and returning—to those against whom we have sinned and who have sinned against us. If Christ has truly set us free from sin (which is rupture of communion) and if the eucharist is the practice wherein we come together, forgiven, over the forgiving victim’s body, then (following Matt 18:15-17) we should lament that broken relationships are given over to outside “counselors” without reconciliation being made first available inside the community as its central practice."
— L Gregory Jones, Embracing Forgiveness, pg 179, 183, par. _______________________________________________________________________

"The practice of forgiveness entails unlearning all those things that divide and corrupt communion and learning to see and live as forgiven and forgiving people. This happens in the community wherein specific habits can be developed in order for this un/learning to take place. The Christian life is not only a matter of acquiring some correct kind of knowledge or cultivating the appropriate emotions or deeds. More fundamentally, it is commitment to a full participation in practices whose disciplines of the body are necessary for the transformation of bodies. Forgiveness requires us to confront our tendencies to see the world either as “lighter” than it is (hence reinforcing cheap grace) or as “darker” than it is (hence making forgiveness impossible)."
— L Gregory Jones, Embracing Forgiveness, pg 164 _______________________________________________________________________

Forward this to every vegan you know

_______________________________________________________________________

locusimperium:

lukexvx:

Here you go locusimperium

So this is the question that Luke originally asked me:

Been wanting to ask this for a while. What do you think of Stringfellow’s tapestry passage in Imposters of God A Private and Public Faith and how that might apply to high church ecclesiology of heavily budgeted architecture/cathedrals/aesthetics? I know it’s basically a justice vs liturgy question of priority (should the emphasis be more missions or rather liturgical formation), but what do you think?

I think you’re establishing a dichotomy that isn’t present in this passage. As Beck notes, Stringfellow’s emphasis here is on freedom, which is a consistent theme throughout his work — that is, the Gospel is a message of freedom from death (/powers/principalities/idolatries) that is also remarkably non-prescriptive. Stringfellow is less concerned with what you do, and more concerned with the location from which you are acting — is it one of freedom in Christ to resist the demonic?
One doesn’t need to sell tapestries or forsake cathedrals. Tapestries and cathedrals can be forms of worshiping God. But the biblical person (a favorite phrase of Stringfellow’s) must not believe that to sell a tapestry or to vacate a cathedral would diminish the church.

Good distinction. So this would move the question into whether there’s a priority of forms of worship. (Which would be conditioned by questions of class—does establishing a hierarchy of worship importances marginalize certain social groups whose needs and abilities might be excluded).
I was moved to ask in reading some Beck blog post a while back where he talked about the pitfalls of justice-oriented liberal Christians ignoring anything related to institutionalized church. While I may be tempted to say something like (generalizing here) God cares way more about doing justice than having a beautiful sanctuary, I recognize the arrogance of a prescription like that so I’m working out the tensions.
/does this make the question still worth exploring?

locusimperium:

lukexvx:

Here you go locusimperium

So this is the question that Luke originally asked me:

Been wanting to ask this for a while. What do you think of Stringfellow’s tapestry passage in Imposters of God A Private and Public Faith and how that might apply to high church ecclesiology of heavily budgeted architecture/cathedrals/aesthetics? I know it’s basically a justice vs liturgy question of priority (should the emphasis be more missions or rather liturgical formation), but what do you think?

I think you’re establishing a dichotomy that isn’t present in this passage. As Beck notes, Stringfellow’s emphasis here is on freedom, which is a consistent theme throughout his work — that is, the Gospel is a message of freedom from death (/powers/principalities/idolatries) that is also remarkably non-prescriptive. Stringfellow is less concerned with what you do, and more concerned with the location from which you are acting — is it one of freedom in Christ to resist the demonic?

One doesn’t need to sell tapestries or forsake cathedrals. Tapestries and cathedrals can be forms of worshiping God. But the biblical person (a favorite phrase of Stringfellow’s) must not believe that to sell a tapestry or to vacate a cathedral would diminish the church.

Good distinction. So this would move the question into whether there’s a priority of forms of worship. (Which would be conditioned by questions of class—does establishing a hierarchy of worship importances marginalize certain social groups whose needs and abilities might be excluded).

I was moved to ask in reading some Beck blog post a while back where he talked about the pitfalls of justice-oriented liberal Christians ignoring anything related to institutionalized church. While I may be tempted to say something like (generalizing here) God cares way more about doing justice than having a beautiful sanctuary, I recognize the arrogance of a prescription like that so I’m working out the tensions.

/does this make the question still worth exploring?

_______________________________________________________________________

Here you go locusimperium

Here you go locusimperium

_______________________________________________________________________

Hidden costs of patriarchy

_______________________________________________________________________

TAKE PICTURES OF ALL YOUR HEROES. Being vegan in OK was really isolating so I was so stoked to be around thousands of radical vegans this week. I got to meet amazing people organizing crucial campaigns for oppressed animals and learned so much. @mouthwings gave a plenary talk on her work undercover in the animal agriculture industry investigating systemic exploitation and abuse. She and TJ got a room of almost 1000 activists crying but fired up about justice and liberation

TAKE PICTURES OF ALL YOUR HEROES. Being vegan in OK was really isolating so I was so stoked to be around thousands of radical vegans this week. I got to meet amazing people organizing crucial campaigns for oppressed animals and learned so much. @mouthwings gave a plenary talk on her work undercover in the animal agriculture industry investigating systemic exploitation and abuse. She and TJ got a room of almost 1000 activists crying but fired up about justice and liberation

_______________________________________________________________________

It’s not clear what shocked people most about the report in Fortune that Whole Foods Market sells goat cheese and tilapia prepared with prison labor—the horrendous exploitation of prisoners for a base rate less than one-tenth of Whole Foods’ starting wage, or the fact that even after paying prisoner-workers sixty cents an hour, that tiny wheel of goat cheese still costs upward of seven dollars. Whichever reason it was, for many the story disturbed the experience that Whole Foods carefully cultivates for its customers.

(Source: weil-weil)

_______________________________________________________________________

earthfirstjournal:

Two Animal Rights Activists Indicted Under Animal Enterprise Terrorism Act

by Will Potter / Green is the New Red

Two animal rights activists have been indicted on federal terrorism charges for allegedly releasing 2,000 mink and fox from fur farms in the Midwest.

Tyler Lang and Kevin Olliff were charged with two counts of violating the Animal Enterprise Terrorism Act and committing “animal enterprise terrorism.”

Olliff is currently in jail in Illinois, where he was sentenced to 30 months in jail for having boltcutters in his Prius.

Lang was arrested outside of a Veggie Grill restaurant in Los Angeles on Thursday, July 10. He had arrived to prepare for a fundraiser at the restaurant to benefit the Bunny Alliance, an animal rights group with which he volunteers.

When he saw FBI agents walking up to the restaurant, he said he knew something was wrong. He was on the phone with a friend, who joked that they were there to spy on the animal rights fundraiser. Before he was arrested, he told his friend “call my lawyer.”

At Lang’s bail hearing at a Los Angeles federal courthouse, the government asked for a $30,000 bond, which is $20,000 above what pre-trial services had recommended.

The prosecutor did not request that Lang be jailed awaiting trial, but said Lang was a flight risk because of his “extreme activism.”

“He has plans to travel the country for what he calls non-profit work,” the prosecutor said, “but what the government calls violent civil disobedience.”

Lang had planned on beginning a tour this weekend with other volunteers, protesting airlines that transport primate for animal experimentation.

Lang may not be able to attend the protests, but other volunteers say they are undeterred.

“We know that Tyler would want us to carry on with the Fight or Flight tour,” said Amanda Schemkes, a Bunny Alliance volunteer. “It’s to further the campaign against the transport of animals to labs, as well as to build and empower grassroots activism in the face of state repression. Our work to help animals continues to be motivated by them rather than stifled by attempts to chill activism.”

The indictments come as hundreds of animal rights activists are in Los Angeles this weekend for the national animal rights conference, where a prominent theme is corporate efforts to label non-violent protest activity as “terrorism.”

Releasing animals from fur farms is clearly against the law, but in the history of underground groups like the Animal Liberation Front not a single human being has been harmed; yet the FBI continues to label animal rights activism as “terrorism.”

New ag-gag laws go even further, criminalizating whistleblowers, undercover investigators and journalists who expose animal cruelty on factory farms.

As FBI agents and prosecutors prepared for Lang’s bail hearing, it was clear that even they were a bit confused about this “terrorism” case.

Outside of the courtroom, one FBI agent was overheard on a cell phone saying: “No, he is being charged with damaging property. Not damaging animals—they are against that.”

Kevin and Tyler’s support website can be found at http://supportkevinandtyler.com/

To write Kevin Oliff – address envelope to Kevin Johnson
IDOC# M42382, Vandalia Correctional Center, P.O. Box 500, Vandalia, IL 62471, USA

_______________________________________________________________________

piperlr:

Reading theology that melts your brain and makes everything you used to believe not make sense anymore is the best.

_______________________________________________________________________

1 2 3 4 5